Tag Archives: the New South

The Jim Crow of Bipartisan Rule

The Public Professor is pleased to present Professor Omar Ali, the first in a series of occasional guest bloggers.

President Barack Obama says that the U.S. Senate rules which quire sixty votes to end filibustering are not only extra-Constitutional but, more importantly stifle the flow of necessary legislation based, more often that not, on partisan interests. He wants to see these rules changed for the sake of better governance on behalf of the American people. I couldn’t agree more. But the Senate rules are only one aspect of our bipartisan government that consistently places partisan interests over those of “the people.”

Turns out, parties aren’t in the Constitution either. Yet, the two major parties have taken over our government. How?  Those who make the rules, rule.

Through self-serving rules and regulations, the two major parties remain in power. Democratic and Republican legislators systematically exclude tens of millions of unaffiliated and independent voters from the electoral process — that is, the 42 percent of the total electorate who identify themselves as neither Democrat nor Republican and are, because of their independence, rendered second-class citizens in the law. In this way, a kind of Jim Crow (historically, the legal disfranchisement of African Americans) persists — now no longer based on race, but on political affiliation. Continue reading The Jim Crow of Bipartisan Rule